Daily Happiness Checklist

This is offered as a series of mantras which lead to happiness, not just a checklist to see if you have what you need to be happy. It is adapted from the Happiness Institute in Australia. If you say it and offer it to the Universe, the Law of Attraction says it will be so. ~Pam

  • I’ve reminded myself of my life purpose
  • I’m clear on my priorities for the day
  • I’ve engaged in exercise
  • I’ve planned to eat healthy
  • I intend to practice meditation/relaxation
  • I will not accept unhelpful, negative thoughts
  • I’m confident today will be a good day
  • I’m hopeful for the future
  • I’m grateful for the people in my life
  • I intend to praise at least one person today
  • I’m determined to find ways to use my strengths
  • I’m going to have fun
  • I will laugh and smile
  • I will endeavor to be in the moment as much as possible
  • I’ll savor all positive experiences

©2008 Dr. Timothy Sharp – the Happiness Institute

Sydney, NSW 2000 Australia

How do We BEAT the BEAST?

It’s only one letter different… beat and beast.  And I think if we change the Z to an L, ALZ can be beaten — but it will take us ALL.

Want to learn what I think we need to do? I’ve just finished the final edits on a white paper posted on my community’s website, ColebrookVillage.com.  There you can read my thoughts about the breast cancer movement and what we need to do to #EndAlz.

Education is key. We cannot beat any beast without knowing about it ~ researchers will work on genetics and biomarkers.  WE can educate ourselves about symptoms, interventions and ways to enhance the lives of those living with Alzheimer’s and related disorders — the individuals diagnosed AND their families.

Here’s what I just learned that YOU need to know.

CAREGIVERS have distinctive symptoms of Alzheimer’s that need treatment. Let me clarify: this does NOT mean that AD is contagious.  It simply means that diseases like Alzheimer’s effect the entire family, not just the person with the diagnosis. This comes from our friend and consultant Paul Raia, PhD.  He said the person diagnosed has symptoms we’re familiar with, such as memory loss, judgment issues and functional losses.  The caregivers have symptoms too, and these include:

  • Physical illness – this is common for people caring for others, and may include muscle strain, back injury as well as susceptibility to viruses due to diminished immunity from stress. Increased cortisol, the stress hormone, has a negative effect on the body.
  • Decreased emotional well-being – this can include caregiver burden, depression and disengagement from the activities a caregiver enjoys.
  • Increasing social isolation – Many caregivers report feeling invisible. Even in caring communities, such as a faith community, friends and acquaintances often look away, or decrease their support if they are unsure what to do to help. As care needs increase in later stages of Alzheimer’s, caregivers have less and less time to maintain social networks.
  • Increased financial challenges – According to the Alzheimer’s Association, a recent study found that the last 5 years of life for a person with dementia cost more than $287,000. Other studies have indicated that 70% of the costs are borne by the family. Medicare does not pay for most of the costs associated with Alzheimer’s and related dementias.  These are expensive diseases.  Families are becoming impoverished paying for the necessary care.  Some spouses receive recommendations from lawyers and financial planners to divorce the person with dementia.  Our system needs fixing, but that’s a different post!

The symptoms for caregivers are just as visible as the patient’s — if you know what to look for.

BUT WHAT DO WE DO ABOUT THE SYMPTOMS?  You know the answer.  Help is out there.  Call me, email me or track me down.  I’m happy to help.  Call the Alzheimer’s Association 24/7 — they’re much easier to track down 🙂  800-272-3900 in multiple languages!

There’s Respite…there are tax deductions… there are support groups…there are therapists… there are medications…. there are exercises… there are social engagement groups for you and the person diagnosed. And opportunities are growing each year.

MAKE YOURSELF ACCEPT HELP.  I know that some days it seems simpler to just do it all yourself.  And it’s true that stress helps us stay alive — but it’s not healthy in the long run, and this is a long-term situation.  GET HELP NOW.

VOICE OVER TALENT

Voice has always been my favorite instrument. I’ve been doing voice over, radio, lectures/presentations and community voice television since 2003. I’ve been singing in choirs, choruses and quartets as long as I can remember. Over the past few decades, my training has focused on Barbershop Harmony. The tone of my voice is similar to Karen Carpenter – a warm mid-range sound with a compassionate and understanding lilt. For voice over talent, my sound offers a professional yet kind image for your brand.  Contact me for fees for digital phone messages, tags, commercial voice-over or other projects.

Alzheimer’s Disease & Dementia Care Seminar: Your first step on the path to becoming a Certified Dementia Practitioner

Seminar tuition

The National Council of Certified Dementia Practitioners requires a foundations course, and credentials it's trainers, licensed to teach the required curriculum. The agenda includes basic information about Alzheimer's and related dementias, stages of progressive neurocognitive diseases, communication strategies, behavioral manifestations, activities, spirituality, environment, information for staffs and family dynamics. Tuition for this course is $200 per student, which includes the full-day seminar, a support-materials manual, continental breakfast, lunch and certificate of completion. SEMINAR DATES in 2017 – November 14, 2017, 8:30am-5:30pm

$200.00